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Location Based Jewellery

Location data typically stays within the realm of online maps and digital check-ins, but in many ways it's the most personal data that you can find. It represents where you are, where you've been, and where you're going. Meshu, by Sha Hwang and Rachel Binx, is a project that takes this sentiment to heart. Select and enter locations on a map or grab your check-ins from foursquare to create your own piece of unique jewelry — necklace, earrings, or cufflinks. Once you've got your design, you have your choice of acrylic, wood, nylon, and silver and you can pick from a variety of colors for each material. Hit complete, they'll fabricate it, and you've got your own personal snapshot of life. – FlowingData
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Psychogeographical Mapping

I kept track of all of my destinations in the downtown area of Savannah, Georgia over the course of a month (January 24, 2008 - February 24, 2008). Each day of the week was assigned a color. A skyline developed consisting of the places I frequented in the city. – Cory Imig
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LEGO Powered Time-Tracking

Software developer Michael Hunger wanted a better way to track the time he spends on various projects throughout the day, so he's opted to use LEGO bricks (pictured) instead of software or time sheets. Each one-line LEGO track represents one day of the workweek, and different colored bricks correspond to different projects. He stacks up a wall for each day to log where his time went or pre-plan the day. – Lifehacker
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Sensory Maps

My name is Kate McLean, an artist and designer, creator of smellmaps of cities around the world. I focus on human perception of the urban smellscape. While the visual dominates in data representation I believe we should tap into alternative sensory modes for individual and shared interpretation of place. – Kate McLean
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Dear Data

Each week we collect and measure a particular type of data about our lives, use this data to make a drawing on a postcard-sized sheet of paper, and then drop the postcard in an English “postbox” (Stefanie) or an American “mailbox” (Giorgia)! Eventually, the postcard arrives at the other person’s address with all the scuff marks of its journey over the ocean: a type of “slow data” transmission. By creating and sending the data visualizations using analogue instead of digital means, we are really just doing what artists have done for ages, which is sketch and try to capture the essence of the life happening around them. However, as we are sketching life in the modern digital age, life also includes everything that is counted, computed, and measured. We are trying to capture the life unfolding around us, but instead we are capturing this life through sketching the hidden patterns found within our data. – Dear Data
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