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PostHistory

PostHistory is one in a series of projects that explore the notion of history in computer applications and online environments. By developing time-based visualizations of digital activities, we hope to raise questions such as: what is digital memory? How can we understand, interact with and, more importantly, share our digital history? The visualizations in PostHistory mainly fall into two main categories: - email landscape - personal email social network Because we are interested in looking at changes over time, the main visual metaphor is the calendar. The social network visualizations are also animated over time. - Fernanda Viegas
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Time Tapestries

The day's activities were recorded within these tapestries by assigning and weaving a specific color code based on the amount of time spent doing each action, such as sleeping, eating, socializing, etc. Subtitles from left to right: October 27-November 1 November 9-16 November 23-28 - Julia Lines Wilson
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8 Years of Dating History

This chart is read left to right, up to down. Each row represents a year in my life (starting at age 15), and is made up of 365 columns representing days. You can navigate through the dates and relationships by pressing the left and right arrow keys, or by hovering over the cell you wish to investigate. A shaded purple or green cell implies that I saw the fellow in person on that day, but that data is only available for my 20s. Enjoy! - Robin We
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Spectro Audio Igo (S.A.I.)

Have you ever wondered what your extra curricular day might look like? S.A.I. provides an overview of a user's web browsing, music listening, and game playing. Tooltips and Song relations: visualizes daily activities alongside music listening data. iGOvis: graphs the moves played in a board game. SpectroVis: visualizes a webpage color from a user's browsing history. S.I.A.: a combination of Tooltips, iGOvis, and SpectroVis to compare these daily activities.
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Personal Budget, Travel, and Word Visualization

As part of a CPSC 583 course at the University of Calgary, Marcial Russo created three distinct visualizations to keep track of personal data, then later combined these visualizations as a whole. The first visualization analyses budget data and compares different spending categories. The second visualization compares travel times, based on various factors. The third visualization displays words used in various university classes.
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The Person I Am

As part of a CPSC 583 course at the University of Calgary, Javier López-Montenegro Ramil created three distinct visualizations to keep track of personal data, then later created an interface to interlock these visualizations together. Javier asked himself three questions, and created visualizations for each question. We are what we eat and what we do. The first visualization logs calorie intake, class time, eating trends, and sleeping patterns. The second visualization provides insight into how late or early Javier is to class based on the weather, and shows Javier's travel speed. Thirdly, Javier tracks where his Facebook contacts are located around the globe. In the final visualization combines all three visualizations to provide a birds eye view of the answers to the above three questions.
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Visits

With visits you can browse your location histories and explore your trips and travels. Our unique map timeline visualization shows the places you have visited and how long you have stayed there. Add photos from Flickr to your visits and share your journey with your family and friends! – visits
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Quantified Self Talk: The Dilemma of Leisure Time

I gave a talk last month at the San Francisco Quantified Self meetup about the time tracking project I’ve been doing over the past 6 years. I would say more, but I don’t want to steal my own thunder. – Greg Kroleski
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Mood Panda

MoodPanda helps you track how you're feeling, with personal analysis, visualisations and interpretations of your mood, and a lovely, friendly and anonymous community of people there to support you if you need them. – Jake Greenwood
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Every Day Of My Life

Every Day of My Life is a visualization of my computer usage statistics from the last 2.5 years. Each line represents one day and each colorful block is the most foreground app running at the given moment. Black areas are periods when my computer is not turned on. Seeping patterns (or lack of them) and time of holidays and travel (longer gaps) can be therefore easily identified. – Marcin Ignac
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