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Life Calendar: How Was Your Day?

Life Calendar: How was your day? is a funny and unique calendar in which you can reflect graphically your every day mood. It can be used as a mini personal diary of life experiences and help us to be conscious with our own wellbeing. Each day can be represented by a clear emoticon face to draw how you felt that day. Five moods are suggested: very good, good, normal, bad, very bad. You can also draw many other faces or even include little notes that you might want to remember. – Wap-oh!
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LastHistory

We believe that a 'casual information visualization' approach can prove valuable for making this personal information available to their creators. In this paper we analyze the data domain of listening histories and present our findings on their structure and what possible user tasks and available patterns it might contain. Additional contextual information can trigger the memory of the user to reveal the reasons for listening decisions. As a second contribution, we give an overview of LastHistory, a visualization of personal listening his- tories from Last.fm that not only allows sophisticated analysis of the underlying data in a non-threatening way, but is also able to show contextual information in the form of photos and calendar entries to help the user remember this time of his or her life. – Dominikus Baur
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mem:o

Technology makes it easy to turn the minutiae of our daily lives into useful data sets, but sometimes it feels bleak seeing every experience or memory broken down into pie charts and bar graphs. mem:o is a unique visualization tool that takes life-logging beyond spreadsheets by transforming data into striking images influenced by Dutch graphic design. The iPad app is free for download and includes two boards, with the option of adding more boards via an in-app purchase. - TechCrunch
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The Examined Life

I have meticulously recorded my daily actions for a total of 40 days. Everything I have done has been organized into 6 categories and brought to life through color and form. Patterns and contrast emerge through visualization, providing permanence to previously transient data and facilitating a new level of self-awareness.
The physical presence of these forms symbolizes the knowledge gained by collecting and analyzing the data. Data are abstract; they have no physical presence and no inherent structure, but our brains evolved to understand the real world, not abstract concepts. By making data tangible, it changes the way we understand and interact with it, augmenting our minds’ ability to grasp digital and mathematical abstractions. – Alex Getty
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Psychogeographical Mapping

I kept track of all of my destinations in the downtown area of Savannah, Georgia over the course of a month (January 24, 2008 - February 24, 2008). Each day of the week was assigned a color. A skyline developed consisting of the places I frequented in the city. – Cory Imig
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LEGO Powered Time-Tracking

Software developer Michael Hunger wanted a better way to track the time he spends on various projects throughout the day, so he's opted to use LEGO bricks (pictured) instead of software or time sheets. Each one-line LEGO track represents one day of the workweek, and different colored bricks correspond to different projects. He stacks up a wall for each day to log where his time went or pre-plan the day. – Lifehacker
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Ward Shelley – Autobiography

A visual representation of Ward Shelley's autobiography.
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Clickflash

Ever since photographer Noah Kalina began his Everyday portrait project 11 years ago (I had no idea he was still actively photographing himself, talk about commitment) there have been hundreds of inspired photogs snapping daily self-portraits. Flickr user clickflashwhir is one of these people, taking hundreds of portraits over the past several yearsTiemen Rapati downloaded 500 of her photos and created this beautiful composite image by finding an average RGB value for each pixel and dividing it by the total number of portraits. – Colossal
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Wheel of Worry

Andrew Kuo presents his inner worries, arguments, counterarguments, and obsessions in the form of charts and graphs. In the three-tiered graph my Wheel of Worry, originally published in the May 16. 2010, New York Times Magazine, Kuo illustrates the things in his life that concern him and his specific feelings about each. On the graph’s innermost ring Kuo shows what causes him anxiety in the moments before sleep (loneliness, death, money, bedbugs, and the new York Knicks); in the middle ring he charts his very specific reactions to his credit card statement; on the outermost ring, what he thinks about as he scratches a lottery ticket. In this chart and others, Kuo brings the graphic language of scientific fact to the irrational emotions associated with everyday life. – Brain Pickings
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Everyday

Ever since October 23rd, 2011 I've taken a photo of myself (almost) everyday. In addition to the time-lapse video that I update yearly, I take the photographs and cut each day into a little strip to make collages. The leftmost strip is January 1st and and the rightmost strip is December 31st. – Dylan Mason

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